BlogNews

Love British Food

By 14th June 2017 No Comments
Sussex Red Mullet for sale in London Borough Market

 

Traditionally, British food has not enjoyed a positive reputation, conjuring up images of bland offerings such as stodgy pies and fry-ups swimming in fat.

However, in 21st-century Britain, this image has never been further from the truth, as across the country top chefs create menus based on fresh British produce. The result is a cuisine as rich and diverse as anywhere in the world.

Fresh local produce

One of the great strengths of British food is the fresh local produce that can be used to create dishes. The fertile soil of Britain is ideal for growing a wide variety of fruit and vegetables, as well as raising livestock. To get the best of this, many of the food outlets that food procurement and margin improvement management experts PSL work with are opting to buy locally, giving a boost to the local economy and ensuring the produce is as fresh as possible.

Local products often only being available seasonally represent a challenge for chefs as it can mean frequently adapting or changing menus, but this increases the diversity of British cuisine – As an island nation, nowhere in the country is too far from the coast, and freshly-caught seafood is becoming increasingly popular. From five-star restaurants to small seaside shacks, there are plenty of opportunities to sample what the waters surrounding the British Isles have to offer.

Traditional favourites

The full English or Scottish breakfast, a Sunday roast, and fish and chips are the staples of British cuisine, and these continue, quite rightly, to have a place in the nation’s hearts. By using well-cooked, good-quality ingredients, the simplicity of these dishes becomes their greatest strength. Even fish and chips can be something of a delicacy, with freshly-caught fish in a light batter a highlight of any day at the seaside.

Regional cuisine

The cuisine of many countries is too broad to be generalised. Even in a small country such as Britain, there are many, many regional specialities, many of which bear the name of their place of origin, such as Cornish pasties, Bakewell tarts, Welsh cakes and Scotch eggs. Regional variations can best be seen on a cheese board, with many counties in Britain producing their own cheese, which vary hugely in texture and flavour.

A sweet tooth

Afternoon tea is as quintessentially British as it gets when it comes to food and drink. Traditionally, tea is served with sandwiches, cakes and scones. However, the popularity of cooking shows such as The Great British Bake Off has increased interest in baking, and the variations of cakes served for afternoon tea has soared. Scones with clotted cream and jam remain a favourite though, with the ongoing argument of whether the jam or cream goes on first.

Cultural influences

The changing nature of British food helps to keep it exciting, so it is no surprise to see old favourites sitting alongside newer additions on menus. Immigrants from a variety of cultures have put their own slant on British food, introducing new ingredients and cooking techniques that enhance fresh British produce. For chefs, restaurateurs and food lovers alike, there has never been a more exciting time for British food.

The full English or Scottish breakfast, a Sunday roast, and fish and chips are the staples of British cuisine, and these continue, quite rightly, to have a place in the nation’s hearts. By using well-cooked, good-quality ingredients, the simplicity of these dishes becomes their greatest strength. Even fish and chips can be something of a delicacy, with freshly-caught fish in a light batter a highlight of any day at the seaside.